Crescent Dragonwagon

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BornEllen Zolotow
(1952-11-25) November 25, 1952 (age 67)
New York City, New York, United States
OccupationWriter
NationalityAmerican
GenreFiction/Nonfiction
RelativesCharlotte Zolotow (mother)
Maurice Zolotow (father)

Crescent Dragonwagon (née Ellen Zolotow, November 25, 1952, New York City) is a writer in six different genres, and a workshop leader. She leads Fearless Writing, which helps many people find their inner writer. She has written fifty traditionally published books, including two novels, seven cookbooks / culinary memoirs, more than twenty children's books, a biography, and a collection of poetry. In addition, she has written for magazines ranging from New York Times Book Review to Lear's, Cosmopolitan, McCall's, and Horn Book.[1]

Dragonwagon and her late husband, Ned Shank, owned Dairy Hollow House, a country inn and restaurant in the Ozark Mountain community of Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Dragonwagon later co-founded the non-profit Writer's Colony at Dairy Hollow, and was active in the cultural and literary life of Arkansas throughout the 31 years she lived in the state full-time.[2] After Shank's death in 2000,[3] Dragonwagon moved to her family's summer home in Vermont.

Since the 2014 death of her subsequent partner, filmmaker-activist David R. Koff,[4] with whom she lived in Vermont for a decade, she has divided her time between New York, Vermont, and Arkansas.

Dragonwagon is the daughter of the writers Charlotte Zolotow and the late Hollywood biographer Maurice Zolotow.[5] She serves as literary executor to both her parents.

Awards[edit]

Dragonwagon's tenth children's book, Half a Moon and One Whole Star, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney and published in 1986, was the winner of a Coretta Scott King Book Award, as well as a Reading Rainbow Selection.

In 1993, Dragonwagon won the Name of the Year award.[6] In 2010, the Dragonwagon Regional was named after her.[7]

In 2003, Dragonwagon's cookbook Passionate Vegetarian won the James Beard book award in the category "Vegetarian/Healthy Focus".[8]

Books[edit]

Biography[edit]

  • Stevie Wonder. 1977. ISBN 0-8256-3908-5.

Cookbooks[edit]

  • Dragonwagon, Crescent (1972). The Commune Cookbook. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-21152-8.
  • Dragonwagon, Crescent (1972). The Bean Book. Workman Pub. ISBN 0-911104-16-X.
  • Dairy Hollow House Cookbook, 1992
  • Dragonwagon, Crescent (1992). Dairy Hollow House Soup & Bread: A Country Inn Cookbook. ISBN 0-89480-751-X., nominated for both the James Beard and IACP Awards
  • Passionate Vegetarian (2002), Winner, James Beard Award
  • The Cornbread Gospels (2007)
  • Bean by Bean: A Cookbook (2011)
  • Putting Up Stuff for the Cold Time: Canning, Preserving & Pickling for Those New to the Art or Not (1973)

Children's books[edit]

Novels[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Crescent Dragonwagon (November 26, 2012). "Over and Over". The Horn Book.
  2. ^ "Crescent Dragonwagon (1952–)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas.
  3. ^ Weintz, Steven B. (November 17, 2002). A Capital Idea: An Illustrated History of the Capital Hotel. University of Arkansas Press. ISBN 9781557287274 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Campbell, Duncan (March 13, 2014). "David Koff obituary" – via www.theguardian.com.
  5. ^ Fox, Margalit (2013-11-19). "Charlotte Zolotow, Author of Books on Children's Real Issues, Dies at 98". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-11-23.
  6. ^ "Names of the Year".
  7. ^ "2010 NOTY: Dragonwagon Regional, Part 1".
  8. ^ "James Beard Foundation Awards Search".

External links[edit]